Several top intelligence officials on Thursday briefed lawmakers from both parties about the FBI’s reported employment of a “spy” in the Russia probe led by special counsel Robert Mueller.

Congress Briefed On FBI ‘Spy’ In Russia Probe

President Donald Trump coined the issue concerning the informant “spygate” and demanded an investigation into the FBI and Justice Department’s alleged use of such a spy.

The New York Times said both Republican and Democratic congressional leaders, like House Intelligence Committee chairman Devin Nunes of California and Democrat Adam Schiff attended the meeting, as well as White House chief of staff John Kelly and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. 

The Times said that Schiff, however, was only allowed to join the first meeting “at the last minute.”

Also present at one of the several meetings was Emmet Floodone of the top members of Trump’s legal team in the Russia probe who is a former Bill Clinton impeachment attorney.

Some top Democratic lawmakers, however, said they were upset by the fact that the Justice Department initially chose to only invite Republican leaders like Nunes and Rep. Trey Gowdy — the chairman of the House Oversight Committee — to the first briefing.

“Never has there been anything so disrespectful of the Congress than what they’re doing today,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi told The Huffington Post. 

Schiff noted in a tweet on Tuesday that it is crucial that the “bipartisan mechanism called the Gang of 8” be used by top intelligence officials at the FBI.


The Gang of Eight refers to bipartisan group of legislators who get to receive the government’s most confidential intelligence information.

Schiff further criticized the ‘Spygate’ scandal in a tweet on Thursday morning.

House Speaker Paul Ryan defended Thursday’s meetings. The Wisconsin Republican, who announced last month that he will not seek re-election, has been criticized for not controlling GOP House members’ attacks on the Russia investigation and federal authorities.

Ryan said in a statement, “we have insisted and will continue to insist on Congress’s constitutional right to information necessary for the conduct of oversight.”