President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer came together in a moment of bipartisanship on Tuesday, making a deal for a $2 trillion infrastructure package. Both Democrats were pleased with the meeting, describing it as “constructive.”

However, some conservative politicians have reservations over the deal; Republicans (save for Trump and some of his advisors) were not invited to the 90-minute meeting, and the means through how the deal would be paid for was not agreed upon.

Schumer, nevertheless, spoke optimistically of the meeting, saying, “There was goodwill in this meeting, and that was different than some of the other meetings that we’ve had, which is a very good thing.” Notably, the last time the Senate Minority Leader met with Trump at the White House was under vastly different circumstances.

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Democratic lawmakers currently do not plan on submitting ideas for how to fund the bill, saying they expect the Trump White House to propose something. Congressional Republicans, however, have expressed their disapproval for the $2 trillion plan, which could find it difficult to pass the Senate, where Republicans hold the majority.

Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) told The Hill, “How this could be achieved in a fiscally responsible way remains the biggest question. Traditional methods for this increased investment would meet substantial pushback.” Meadows is one of Trump’s political friends and the chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.), the highest ranking Republican among the Appropriations subcommittee, added, “The devil is always in the details.”

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) has a particular distaste for the bill, citing how his party would not want to increase taxes or alter the tax cuts from Trump’s tax law revision. “The common denominator, no matter what the subject the Democrats bring up, is a tax increase,” McCarthy said.

Currently, Trump is slated to meet with Pelosi and Schumer again in three weeks.