Brett Kavanaugh vehemently denied having anything remotely resembling a drinking problem when testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

The 53-year-old Supreme Court nominee responded to a question from Arizona prosecutor Rachel Mitchell about whether or not he has ever “passed out” from intoxication by saying “I’ve gone to sleep” after consuming alcohol.

“I have never blacked out,” Kavanaugh added.

Mitchell went on to ask Kavanaugh whether he ever ended up with fewer or different clothes after a night of heavy drinking, or if he ever failed to remember anything he did following an evening of consuming alcohol. The judge answered “no” to all of these questions.

Throughout his testimony, Kavanaugh repeatedly tried to cement his image as a model student and top athlete in high school at Georgetown Preparatory in Bethesda, Maryland. He also denied claims his friend and former classmate Mark Judge made against him in past writings, where he described Kavanaugh as a frequently inebriated student. The Supreme Court pick said Judge was actually the one with the severe drinking problem, and that he himself only liked to casually drink beer.

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Kavanaugh also seemed combative during his interactions with Committee members. He often refused to directly answer many of the questions he was asked and never explicitly said that he would be prepared for the FBI to launch an investigation into the allegations brought by his accuser, Dr. Christine Blasey Ford. 

“The FBI doesn’t reach a conclusion,” Kavanaugh repeatedly said on Thursday. “They would give you a couple 302s that just tell you what we said.”

Kavanaugh even responded to a question from Minnesota Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar about his drinking habits by asking her about her own history with alcohol, although he then apologized for this.

Several television pundits eventually started saying they believed Kavanaugh is likely terrified of a potential FBI investigation into the claims against him and perhaps also of Judge contradicting his statements about him.