The Democratic-led House Judiciary Committee will vote Thursday to authorize subpoenas for 12 of former Special Counsel Robert Muellers witnesses, including President Donald Trump‘s senior adviser Jared Kushner and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions. 

The dozen witnesses — which also include former national security adviser Michael Flynn, former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, former Trump aide Rob Porter and former chief of staff John Kelly — all delivered key testimony to the special counsel about Trump’s attempts to stop the Russia probe into him and his associates. The Democratic-led House panel is sure to face continued opposition from the president’s administration, which has already barred certain officials like former White House Counsel Don McGahn and former Communications Director Hope Hicks. 

Here is the full list of witnesses who are now expected to be subpoenaed:

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Many Democratic lawmakers have already said publicly that they support beginning formal impeachment proceedings against Trump following the revelations from the 400-page report Mueller released in April about his probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Although Trump was never charged with collusion or obstruction of justice, the special counsel said the president was not completely exonerated either.

Mueller is scheduled to testify before the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees next week.

“As always, I remain open to reaching a reasonable accommodation and will not issue subpoenas if the information we are seeking is voluntarily provided. We will get answers one way or the other,” Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) said in a statement.

Several GOP lawmakers blasted the subpoenas as simply an effort by Democrats to obtain a different result in Mueller’s investigation.

“Mr. Mueller’s team issued more than 2,800 subpoenas before concluding that no Americans conspired with Russia,” Rep. Doug Collins (R-Georgia), the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee, said in a statement. “Even if Chairman Nadler still believes subpoenas are conversation starters, it’s hard to imagine this handful of subpoenas will do anything but reinforce the principal conclusions we’ve been able to read about for months.”