President Donald Trump may have attempted to antagonize Amazon – and, by extension, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos – from the White House, personally pushing for a dramatic increase in U.S. Postal Service charges specifically for Amazon packages.

Trump met with U.S. Postmaster General Megan Brennan and pressed her to double the charges on Amazon packages. Brennan informed the president in multiple conversations this year that the charges are set through contracts and must be reviewed by a regulatory commission and that the relationship between postal Services and Amazon are beneficial, according to the Washington Post. She reportedly gave Trump a set of slides breaking down the different companies, including Amazon, that are also partners for deliveries.

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Despite Brennan’s assurances, Trump has insisted that Amazon is having a negative impact on the American people through his favorite medium, Twitter.

 

 

Along with these claims of Amazon costing the Postal Service money, Trump also alleged in 2017 that Amazon fails to pay “internet taxes,” which do not exist. It is believed that the president’s animosity toward Amazon stems from his dislike for his portrayal in the Washington Post, which is owned by Bezos, and feels he can harm the Post and Bezos through Amazon.

Bezos engaged with Trump in a small Twitter feud in 2015, firing back at Trump’s accusations of using the Post as a “tax shelter” with a Tweet of his own, wishing to send the president into space.

 

 

In more recent years Bezos has not said much regarding his clashes with Trump, but at the Axel Springer Awards 2018, he said, “whether it’s the current U.S. administration or any other government agency around the world – Amazon is now a large corporation and I expect us to be scrutinized,” according to Business Insider.

While Amazon has so far withstood Trump’s attacks, the president is not giving up and the Post reports that he has met with at least three groups of senior advisors to discuss Amazon’s business practices.