According to photographs and an analysis from Beyond Parallel, North Korea is rebuilding one of their long-range rocket sites, the Sohae Satellite Launching Station. North Korea has utilized this site for satellite launches in the past, using technology reminiscent of intercontinental missiles. Beyond Parallel, which has located 20 of North Korea’s missile testing sites, is an organization sponsored by the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank.

Citing a picture taken on March 2, Beyond Parallel’s Victor Cha claims the activity at this testing location is “evident at the vertical engine test stand and the launch pad’s rail-mounted rocket transfer structure.” Continuing, Cha says, “The activity they are undertaking now is consistent with preparations for a test, though the imagery thus far does not show a missile being moved to the launch pad.”

Moreover, the ground activity demonstrates “that they do have a (nuclear intercontinental ballistic missile) capability that is not just developmental, but in the prototype phase. They’ve already tested a few of these and it looks like they’re preparing the launch pad for another act.”

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“This renewed activity, taken just two days after the inconclusive Hanoi Summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, may indicate North Korean plans to demonstrate resolve in the face of U.S. rejection of North Korea’s demands at the summit to lift five U.N. Security Council sanctions enacted in 2016-2017,”  the report concluded.

Trump and Un met last week at Hanoi for their second summit, where negotiations between the two leaders collapsed. Speaking of his decision to leave, Trump explained in a Saturday speech that he “had to walk.”

“Because every once in a while, you have to walk, because the deal wasn’t a deal that was acceptable to me,” Trump said. However, the president added how “the one thing we have, though, is we have no testing, no missiles going up, no rockets going up. No nuclear testing.

Speaking with reporters on Wednesday, Trump said he would be “very disappointed” if North Korea is truly rebuilding its rocket sites. “I would be very, very disappointed in Chairman Kim,” he said. “I don’t think I will be, but we’ll see what happens. We’ll take a look. It will ultimately get solved.”