Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) admitted to using a fake Twitter account under the pseudonym “Pierre Delecto” to monitor online politics and defend himself.

In a lengthy profile of the Utah Senator by the Atlantic‘s McKay Coppins, Romney said he uses a secret Twitter lurker account.

“I won’t give you the name of it,” he told Coppins, but “I’m following 668 people.”

He then showed him some of the big-name accounts he follows, including journalists, late-night comedians and athletes. His lurker account does not follow President Donald Trump, because “he tweets so much.”

After the profile was published, Slate launched an investigation to find Romney’s account, ultimately identifying a Twitter user “Pierre Delecto” as matching the description. Coppins called Romney Sunday night to confirm, and the senator’s only response was “C’est moi.” (Meaning “it’s me” in French).

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The account, identified as @qaws9876, has since been made private. However, some of his posts are still visible via screenshots other users took.

Bloomberg News reporter Jennifer Jacobs tweeted, “Pierre Delecto, likely Mitt Romney’s ghost account, follows about 700 people, including politicians and operatives. Also political reporters, including @SteveTDennis and me”

She attached a screenshot of one of Pierre’s replies to Steve Dennis in which he defended Romney by adding his name to a list of GOP senators “sticking up for Richard Burr.”

Sen. Richard Burr (R-North Carolina) was criticized by GOP members for subpoenaing Donald Trump Jr. as part of the Intelligence Committee’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Ask the Truth News added a couple other screenshots to the mix, affirming his opposition to Trump. The first screenshot shows Pierre defending Romney’s strategy to conservative, anti-Trump writer Jennifer Rubin. In the second image, Pierre wrote that Romney was the “Only Republican to hit Trump on Meuller [Mueller] report, only one to hit Trump on character time and again..” The last screenshot shows him saying “loyal to principle trumps loyalty to party or person.”

One America News host Jack Posobiec posted a video scrolling through Pierre’s timeline.

Twitter jumped at the opportunity to speculate and joke about frenchman Pierre Delecto.

Pari delicto, meaning “equal fault” in Latin, is a legal term used to deem that two people or entities are equally at fault.