Billionaire Mike Bloomberg is not afraid to tap into his own wallet to prevent President Donald Trump from being elected, even if he does not win the Democratic nomination.

Bloomberg did not rule out spending up to a billion dollars of his own to help whoever receives the Democratic nomination, even if it means supporting Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) or Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts).

“I really don’t agree with them,” Bloomberg said of the two candidates who lean more Democratic socialist, “but I’d still support them, yes, because compared to Donald Trump that’s easy.”

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He said the amount of financial support would depend on how much help the candidate would need.

“It depends whether the candidate needs help; if they’re doing very well, they need less. If they’re not, they’ll need more,” he told the New York Times after a lunch stop during a campaign tour through Texas.

While he did not rule out the possibility of spending a billion on his effort to ensure a Democratic president, he made it clear he would prefer to spend less than that amount.

“You know how much money a billion dollars is?” Bloomberg said. “It’s a lot of money to me. It’s a lot of money to anybody.”

Bloomberg’s estimated net worth is just over $58 billion, according to Forbes.

Both he and fellow billionaire candidate Tom Steyer have come under fire for trying to buy the nomination.

Bloomberg has spent an estimated $120 million on political television ads, significantly more than the second highest spender, Biden, with an approximate $1.9 million.

“We do not believe that billionaires have the right to buy elections, and that is why we are going to overturn Citizens United, that is why multi-billionaires like Mr. Bloomberg are not going to get very far in this election, that is why we are going to end voter suppression in America,” Sanders said during a town hall in New Hampshire after Bloomberg announced his entrance into the race.

Steyer, whose net worth hovers around $1.6 billion, recently qualified for the January debate based on his rise in state polls. Bloomberg’s expensive campaign, on the other hand, has sent him polling above some of the earlier, more-established candidates.

RealClearPolitics national polling average from Dec. 27 to Jan. 12 found Bloomberg polling at 6% nationwide, behind Biden, Sanders, Warren and Pete Buttigieg.

Bloomberg said he would not use funds to attack any candidate, even if he strongly disagrees with their policies and ideas.