During a campaign rally in Great Falls, Montana, on Thursday night, President Donald Trump attacked Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), belittling the #MeToo movement in the process.

When discussing prospective presidential candidates, the president used the opportunity to take a jab at Sen. Warren, who is a rumored contender within the Democratic party, by calling her “the fake Pocahontas.” This is the most recent hit in a series of barrages the President has taken to undermine the potential candidate. In the past, he has consistently called the senator’s Native American heritage into question, insinuating that she only made the claim to further advance her political career.

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The president went on to joke that he would dare Warren to take an ancestry test if they were to ever debate. In the same breath, he also took light of the #MeToo movement, sarcastically noting that it required him to “be very gentle” when throwing the kit her way.

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“I promise you I’ll do this, you know those little kits they sell on television for $2 — ‘Learn your heritage,’ we will take that little kit and say — but we have to do it gently, because we’re in the #MeToo generation, so have to be very gentle,” Trump said.

The #MeToo movement highlights the widespread problem of sexual harassment and sexual assault by encouraging victims to speak up about their experiences using the hashtag #MeToo. Warren herself had posted the phrase “Me Too” to her Facebook page back in October.

Trump’s comment comes amid widespread skepticism over his recent decision to hire former Fox News executive Bill Shine as the newest White House Deputy Chief of Staff. Shine had previously been forced out of Fox over his alleged involvement in covering up cases of sexual misconduct while heading the network.

Warren has since fired back at Trump, tearing into him over his zero tolerance immigration policy, which had the effect of separating an unprecedented number of families at the border.

Faced with a court imposed deadline, the administration has resorted to using DNA testing to find and reunite close to 3,000 children currently in its custody with their parents.