White House adviser Stephen Miller‘s great-grandfather was denied U.S. citizenship after applying in 1932, according to a recently released document.

Stephen Miller’s Great-Grandfather Failed Naturalization Test

Yahoo News on Thursday shared a photo of a court order denying Nison Miller citizenship for one simple reason: “ignorance.” That was the only word added to this section of the document.

The revelation is ironic to say the least, as 32-year-old Miller was recently revealed to have played a major role in crafting President Donald Trump‘s administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy on illegal immigration, which has led to thousands of young children being separated from their parents at the border. Trump signed an executive order ending the separations after receiving much backlash from both sides of the political spectrum.

SLIDESHOW: DONALD TRUMP’S 30 CRAZIEST TWEETS

“Unless your ancestors came on a slave ship or you’re Native American,” everyone arrived to the U.S. as an immigrant, says Jennifer Mendelsohn, a woman who became famous after creating the #resistancegenealogy campaign last summer after Republican Rep. Steve King of Iowa said in a tweet: “We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.” Mendelsohn then discovered records that showed King’s grandmother came from Germany at age four in 1894 alongside her 2-year-old brother and sister.

“The point isn’t to play ‘gotcha,’” says Renee Stern Steinig, a former president of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island, who first found the Miller naturalization application last summer. “It’s to show that we are a nation of immigrants, and you are here because someone else picked up and came here for a better life.”

Steining noted that the court document likely meant to describe Miller’s great-grandfather as “ignorant” in the literal sense of the term. He may have simply answered some questions on the U.S. naturalization test incorrectly, but wasn’t necessarily stupid or uneducated.

Miller is known for being aggressively xenophobic and for having helped orchestrate many of the Trump administration’s other immigration policies, including the travel ban placed on residents from seven Muslim-majority countries just days after the president took office. Several courts have struck down the ban, but others have upheld certain provisions from it.

Miller has also been unyielding in his support of Trump’s unfounded claims on many other issues, like the president’s assertion that millions of illegal immigrants voted against him in the 2016 election.