The White House has drawn criticism after it was revealed that it had spent $1 million on a fleet of four limousines for President Donald Trump‘s two-day visit to Ireland. Each vehicle cost $233,000, for a combined total of $935,000 of taxpayer money.

The administration was also attacked following reports that it had cost millions of dollars to send the president to the United Kingdom for three days. $1.2 million was spent on a spate of rooms at the InterContinental Hotel Park Lane, as well as an additional $339,000 on rooms at a Hilton on Park Lane. The various charges continue, all costing several thousands of dollars each.

Presidential visits always cost a fortune to both local taxpayers and domestic taxpayers. One of the biggest local costs is that of security. The visiting country rarely pays for the regional security that is required to protect things such as motorcades and state visits, placing the cost on the local taxpayers.

Domestic taxpayers also take a heavy hit, as bringing a world leader as powerful as the president of the United States anywhere costs an immense amount of cash. Just operating Air Force One costs $228,000 an hour, and that can only fit so many people. Not only does the president require top-tier room, board and transportation, but they also require a sizable security detail—and that security detail needs to be housed, fed, and transported as well. The expenses only grow as more people are added to the president’s entourage, such as children, spouses, and political advisors. As Trump has many adult children, each with their own spouses, the costs relating to his visits abroad are often high.

While many criticize Trump for excessive travel costs, the fact is that bringing the president anywhere is simply expensive. For example, President Barack Obama reportedly spent over $100 million on travel over the course of his eight-year tenure. However, while pricey presidential trips aren’t out of the norm, the Trump administration does have a history of unethically expensive and wasteful business trips, such as the $124,000 spent in excess by ex-EPA head Scott Pruitt.