Animal rights activists are castigating Donald Trump Jr., President Donald Trump’s son, for auctioning off a week-long trophy-hunting trip to Alaska with him.  

The yacht-based tour would include an expedition guide. The sale is being organized in auction-form at an annual hunting convention in Reno, Nevada.

The hunt tour is a four-day event, which features the chance to shoot black-tailed deer and other animals native to the Alaskan forest alongside the president’s son. 

Bidding for the commercialized outing ascended to over $10,000. The Safari Club International (SCI) is hosting the auction. All proceeds from the public sale, which are expected to exceed $5 million, will go toward funding for the SCI’s hunter advocacy and wildlife conservation efforts.

Other prizes include the opportunity to skin Buffalo in Zimbabwe and kill elephants and other large mammals in Namibia with Trump Jr. in a trophy-hunting junket.

The auctioneer will also provide another prize for the highest bidder – a 10-day South African crocodile hunting excursion also alongside the president’s son. 

“This year we will be featuring Donald Trump Jr., a man who needs no introduction, and who’s [sic] passion for the outdoors makes him the number one ambassador for our way of life,” the listing advertises.

Trump Jr. is an avid hunter who routinely posts social media updates of himself sporting different weapons. 

The announcement for the prized-tours follows the publication of Trump Jr. killing of a rare-species of Mongolian sheep last summer.

Kitty Block, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, took a slap at the SCI and Trump Jr., stating, “this annual event is the largest meeting in the world of people who celebrate the senseless killing, buying and selling of dead animals for bragging rights. As our planet suffers an extinction crisis, it is business as usual for the trophy hunting industry and SCI, who continue to revel in spending millions of dollars every year to destroy imperiled wildlife.”

In 2018, the Trump administration loosened importation restrictions on big-game animals such as elephants and lions, making prey more affordable and available for trophy-hunting.