On Friday, Judge Dabney L. Friedrich of the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia allowed the Biden administration’s replacement eviction ban to stay in effect, explaining that she lacked authority to block a public health policy. Friedrich said she did not believe that the administration will prevail in the Supreme Court.

Roughly 6.5 million renters’ households are believed to be behind on their rent payments, according to the Census survey. The moratorium is expected to stay in place until October 3.

“The Administration believes that CDC’s new moratorium is a proper use of its lawful authority to protect the public health,” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement Friday. “We are pleased that the district court left the moratorium in place, though we are aware that further proceedings in this case are likely.”

Friday’s decision is bad news for the small landlords who have been waiting for the moratorium to end this month.

According to a recent survey by the National Rental Home Council, about 23 percent of small landlords leasing single-family rents had given up at least one property as of February this year.

In response to small landlords’ complaints, some Democrats argue that renters who are few months behind their rent would likely become homeless once the moratorium expires.

“Yes, the small landlords are at a disadvantage, but guess what, they know how to go to the bank, they know how to get a loan,” Chair of the House Financial Services Maxine Waters (D-California) said July 30 during the rally support for extending the moratorium. “They know how to deal with hard times.”

“I believe that they can hang on until [the relief] flows smoothly, and I do not believe that the families, many of whom have three and four children, have that opportunity,” she added.

 

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